DAN Training & Education

oxygen first aid training

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DAN Training

DAN Training & Education
Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries


DAN´s Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries Provider Course was designed to fill the void in oxygen first aid training available for the general diving public.

This course represents entry level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public in recognizing possible dive related injuries and providing emergency oxygen first aid while activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and/or arranging for evacuation to the nearest available medical facility.

In DAN´s most recent dive accident record, less than 33% of injured divers received emergency oxygen in the field. Few of those received oxygen concentrations approaching the recommended 100%. DAN and all major diving instructional agencies recommend that all divers be qualified to provide 100% oxygen in the field to those injured in a dive accident.

DAN Training & Education
Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies


Every year more than 4,000 Americans die from drowning and many more suffer from near-drowning events.

According to the 1998 National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA) Annual Sports Participation Survey, 58.2 million Americans participated more than once in swimming during the year. The same study identified nearly 30 million people who participated in power boating, sailing, kayaking, rafting or canoeing.

When swimmers and boaters have near-drowning accidents, water in their lungs keeps their lungs from working properly and they don't get an adequate amount of oxygen. This may cause secondary drowning; victims appear to survive an incident only to die at home a few hours later. Administering 100 percent oxygen first aid immediately after an accident improves the victim's survival chances.

For nearly a decade, DAN has preached the benefits of providing oxygen to injured scuba divers. During that time more than 80,000 people worldwide have been trained in this first aid skill. In March of 1999, DAN Services, Inc., a wholly owned for-profit subsidiary of Divers Alert Network, launched the Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic Emergencies (Aquatics) program. Its goal is to extend the life-saving skills of oxygen first aid to people who live and play in and around water. Providing high concentrations of oxygen to near-drowning victims in the first few minutes after rescue can prevent serious or even fatal complications.

DAN Training & Education
First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries


A diver surfaces from a dive in an area abundant with coral, removes his fins and finds redness, swelling and blisters just beginning to show on his left ankle. He also experiences a stinging sensation on the same ankle.

A diver, following a dive to an area filled with marine life, notices a small bite pattern on his lower right leg and some stiffness; he also experiences difficulty swallowing, has a generalized weakness and a slight numbness in the area of the bite.

A diver experiences pain, nausea and some swelling associated with a purple-and-black puncture wound in his left knee.

The common thread from each of the three injuries is that they likely came from contact with some form of hazardous marine life. Given similar circumstances with you or a dive buddy, would you be able to appropriately treat each injury?

Although serious hazardous marine life injuries are rare, most divers experience minor discomfort from unintentional encounters with fire coral, jellyfish and other marine creatures at some point in their dive careers. Knowing how to minimize these injuries helps you reduce diver discomfort and pain.

The First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries program is designed to provide knowledge regarding specific types of marine creature injuries and the general first aid treatment for those injuries.

DAN Training & Education
Automated External Defibrillators for Scuba Diving


This course represents entry-level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public to better recognize the warning signs of Sudden Cardiac Arrest and administer first aid using Basic Life Support techniques and Automated External Defibrillators while activating the local emergency medical services, (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest appropriate medical facility. * The mean age of divers who die each year in dive fatalities tracked by DAN is gradually increasing. It is now approximately 42 years of age. Divers are getting older, and older people are getting involved in diving.

* Of the 78 dive fatalities in the DAN 2001 Report on Decompression Illness, Diving Fatalities and Project Dive Exploration, based on 1999 fatalities, 7.7 percent of them were caused directly by heart disease. At the same time, heart disease was the direct cause of death for 26 percent of the fatalities involving divers over the age of 35.
* On top of that, 25 percent of divers involved in diving fatalities were also reported to be taking heart medications.

Heart disease is a common problem. To ignore that it affects divers as much as it affects the general population does divers a disservice. When you consider that diving is often done from remote locations - on beaches or off of dive boats - that are far removed from emergency medical help, it is important to prepare for every emergency.

DAN Training & Education
Automated External Defibrillators for Aquatic Emergencies


This course represents entry-level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public to better recognize the warning signs of Sudden Cardiac Arrest and administer first aid using Basic Life Support techniques and Automated External Defibrillators while activating the local emergency medical services, (EMS) and / or arranging for evacuation to the nearest appropriate medical facility. * In the United States, sudden cardiac arrest claims more than 225,000 to 250,000 lives a year, according to the American Heart Association.

* Ninety three percent of the people involved in a submersion incident die from cardiac arrest. Most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation. There are several causes of ventricular fibrillation including:
* Cardiovascular disease
* Drowning
* Hypothermia
* Electrical shock The only definitive treatment for ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation.

This course teaches lay-providers to use an automated external defibrillator to defibrillate a fibrillating heart and restore a normal rhythm.

DAN Training & Education
Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals


The remote nature of dive accidents, whether a few hours from shore or days from civilization, frequently requires more advanced levels of care than are offered by traditional or entry-level CPR programs. DAN Instructors and Instructor Trainers will now be able to offer a healthcare provider-level basic life support program for their student and divers.

Called Basic Life Support for Dive Professionals (BLSPRO), this program is ideal for dive professionals and divers interested in understanding professional-level resuscitation techniques. This program is designed to be applicable to the diving market, including scenes and scenarios from dive situations, as well as the non-diving/healthcare market.

Coupled with DAN’s existing Training Programs and the new Advanced Oxygen First Aid program, DAN Instructors and Instructor Trainers will now be able to offer a complete diving emergency program.

This program also addresses basic life support skills for adults, children and infants.

Skills learned in this program that set it apart from lay-provider level CPR courses include:
two-person CPR;
ventilation using a bag valve mask;
finger sweep;
suctioning; cricoid pressure;
and the technique for caring for an unconscious choking victim.

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